Saving the Croatian Salt-and-Pepper Penguins

Four years ago, my friend Linda and her husband took a three-week cruise along the Dalmatian Coast of the Adriatic Sea. Their ship anchored at a port in Croatia, and passengers descended on the town shops. Unfortunately, all the shops were closed for lunch.

Mr. Pepper Penguin looks happy to have Mrs. Salt Penguinat his side once more, ready for table service in spite of having once lost her head. Unfortunately, we were so intent on putting her back together, we forgot to snap a picture of her broken body, and by the time we remembered, we weren't about to removed her head again just for a photo shoort. We think she prefers it that way.

Mr. Pepper Penguin looks happy to have Mrs. Salt Penguin at his side once more, ready for table service in spite of having once lost her head. Unfortunately, we were so intent on putting her back together, we forgot to snap a picture of her broken body, and by the time we remembered, we weren't about to remove her head again just for a photo shoot. We think she prefers it that way.

When Linda returned later, she found a darling pair of penguin salt-and-pepper shakers and purchased them on the spot. Back home in the U.S., her family used them every day. “They’re far too cute to save for special occasions!” she said.

Recently, when Linda returned from shopping and set a bag of groceries on the kitchen counter, the bag scooted farther than she anticipated, and it knocked one of the penguins to the tile floor. In the crash, the female penguin was decapitated.

Linda felt terrible. While the set itself had not been expensive, a return trip to buy  replacements would cost at least $10,000. Now, what was she going to do with the remaining penguin shaker? She mourned the loss of the set.

After reading our blogs about the Gentle Art of Mending with Glue, she posted a comment. “Now I know what to do with broken stuff . . . bring it to you!” she said.

I responded, “As for bringing your broken stuff to us — and you live close enough to actually do it — let me gently point out that our purpose is to inspire readers to undertake their own projects. So be sure to write back and let us know of your progress.”

Time went by, and when I learned that Linda was too busy juggling work, school, and grandkids to shop for the right type of glue, I told her, “The next time you’re in the neighborhood, bring the penguins along. I have plenty of epoxy.”

Linda wipes off excess glue that squished out after she reunited Mrs. Penguin's head with her neck.

Linda wipes off excess glue that squished out after she reunited Mrs. Penguin's head with her neck.

That’s what she did. The break was a clean one, so once Linda mixed the resin and hardener together, she spread epoxy on the broken neck’s rim. Then she gently set the head on top and pressed down to ensure excellent adhesion.

The glue dried during our visit, and when it was time to wrap up the penguins and take them home, Linda was pleased. “You can’t even see the break!” she exclaimed. “I just saved $10,000!”

That’s right. They don’t call us the Fiercely Frugal Savage Sisters for nothing.

Written by Fiercely Frugal Savage Sister Diana

© 2009, The Savage Sisters

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