Repair a Broken Toilet Seat

The odd shape posed a challenge in finding the right spot for the clamps. But gentle pressure on the brass fittings kept the crack closed tightly enough for the mend to dry straight.

The odd shape posed a challenge in finding the right spot for the clamps. But gentle pressure on the brass fittings kept the crack closed tightly enough for the mend to dry straight.

My boss’s husband came down the hall and entered the kitchen where I was rinsing luncheon plates. “I owe you a toilet seat,” he said.

I gasped and thought, I should have known. While cleaning house for the staff luncheon, I’d noticed a small crack in the oak ring. But I never thought it would actually give way under one of my guests. “I’m so sorry,” I told him. “You don’t owe me anything. I’ll just pick up a new one tomorrow at the home-improvement store down the road.”

But as I unscrewed the bolts that attached it to the porcelain toilet, I did what comes naturally to a Savage Sister. I wondered what else I could use the ring and lid for prior to throwing them in the trash. A gauche picture frame? Firewood? Hey, wait a minute! Wood is very glueable. Why didn’t I just try fixing the silly thing?

I found my handy dandy wood glue, squeezed some into the split area, and tightened it all down with two clamps. The next day, I replaced the good-as-new toilet seat in the bathroom. I figure I saved anywhere from $20 to $75 in exchange for a few minutes of time and a little bit of labor. Not only that but I also saved the gasoline it would have taken to drive to the store, and I postponed the seat’s trip to the landfill. A win-win situation all around.

An empty olive-oil bottle lets me see the assorted brass fittings inside.

An empty olive-oil bottle lets me see the assorted brass fittings inside.

HOARDER ALERT! We definitely don’t recommend saving up old, broken toilet seats until you can find a use for them. However you might want to remove the brass hardware and think about any uses you can find for those pieces. I’ve used the oddly shaped fittings in a number of creative ways, including as a latch for a full-length mirror that was mounted on a bathroom door by means of a piano hinge.

Written by Fiercely Frugal Savage Sister Diana

© 2008-2009, The Savage Sisters

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This entry was posted in The Gentle Art of Mending with Glue and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Repair a Broken Toilet Seat

  1. Joan Husby says:

    Wish I’d seen this before tossing out a perfectly good seat. The crack is at the top of the ring, right? If it was at the bottom, you’d only need one clamp? I like your storage container idea.

  2. savagesisters says:

    Since this was the first toilet-seat repair I attempted, I can’t say for sure that you would need only one clamp if the split was in a different location on the ring. My thought is to place clamps wherever you can get them to stay put. Perhaps someone else can give advice on this?

    Anyway, thanks for writing. Because I know you personally and am aware that you grew up in the woods of Washington State as part of a creative and thrifty family, I realize what a goldmine of money-saving information you possess. Please do write again.

    Diana for the Savage Sisters

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